ECCT in the ‘Twenties’

Historical comparisons are useful for discerning the values of a given time period and for considering the similarities and differences that reveal historical change evident from one era to the…

Mr. Fortune

I stood at his grave with a mixture of emotions: grief over the oppression this man lived and the injustice done to his body after death; relief that his body lay undisturbed in the same dirt with the wealthiest families in Waterbury; and joy knowing that he is still visited — that who he is individually and the history he represents is not forgotten. I opened my prayer book and read silently the prayer at the end of Burial of the Dead: Rite I.

Touring the Glebe House

This Thursday is the 235th anniversary of the consecration of the Rt. Rev. Samuel Seabury as the first American Bishop of the Episcopal Church in Connecticut and the wider Episcopal Church. …

Stories from the past: 45th anniversary of women’s ordination

oday is the 45th anniversary of the first ordination of a woman to the priesthood in the Episcopal Church, and the 40th anniversary of the first woman ordained in ECCT – The Reverend Joan Horwitt. To celebrate and reflect upon the past 45 years, I met with our Archivist, Greg, to see if he had any fun and interesting finds around women’s ordination. I not only acquired a new online folder of scanned images of newspaper clippings and whole booklets from the 1970s arguing for and against women’s ordination, but Greg and I dove deep into one theological question: symbolism associated with the clergy person.

Stories from the past: WWII Episcopal Chaplains

A couple weeks ago, I received an email from our Archivist at The Commons, Greg Farr. He had found a small box filled with pictures and correspondents between Episcopalian Connecticut natives serving as chaplains in World War II.
These letters and photographs were sent upon the request of the Rt. Rev. Walter Henry Gray, the eighth bishop of the Episcopal Church in Connecticut.